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Like many countries that have a history with the Transatlantic Slave Trade, Brazil has never been able to grapple the matters of race. Frankly, no other country on that side of the world with the historic significance of the Transatlantic Slave Trade has competently figured out how to navigate the matters of race.

Data shows that out of the more than 9.5 million people taken from Africa between the 16th and 19thcenturies, more than 4 million slaves landed in Rio de Janeiro.  That’s nearly 10 times more than the total number of slaves sent to North America during this time frame.

After hundreds of years of silence and denial, leaders in Brazilrecognized the contributions from those of Africa descent during the 2016 Summer Olympic Games and addressed the impact enslaved people made on the country’s history.

People of color felt it was a turning point for the country to tackle racism head-on in a place where the impact of slavery continue to manifest itself in the obstacles Afro-Brazilians face compared to their white counterparts.

You see it in Rio’s favelas, which translates to “low-income neighborhoods,” where Afro-Brazilians disproportionately dwell and in the workplace where on average, black Braziliansearn 57 percent less than white Brazilians.

You also witness the impacts of a post-slavery society in the criminal justice system where Black people make up more than 64 percent of the prisonpopulation, and black youth are killed at an alarming rate.

In 2017, the Permanent Forum Racial Equality, a Brazilian coalition that advocates on behalf of black and anti-racist movements, petitioned the UN’s Human Rights Council on the rate of targeted homicides of young black Brazilians, as reported in Face 2 Face Africa.

The report found that black youth are murdered in Brazil every 23 minutes. More than 70% of murder victims in Brazil are black and 93% of the time, they are men.

But the study gets worse.

Investigators concluded that they “came upon a cruel and undeniable reality: ‘the Brazilian state, directly or indirectly, perpetrates the genocide of the young black population.’”

The report only confirmed what anti-racists advocates and black people have known for some time.

African Women’s Legacy: From Hatshepsut to Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

But one thing that sticks out in the report is that Brazilians had come to expect young black men to be killed.  Lawyer Daniel Teixeira told the Agencia Brasil that the situation in Brazil had become “neutralized.”

Read more about the study and its findings here.

 

Source: Travel Noire

It would be hard to find a little girl who’s never wanted to be a Disney princess. Or any princess for that matter. Unfortunately, our media is not very inclusive and the majority of iconic princesses in children’s movies and books fit a very stiff mold that not all children can relate to. But as our society is becoming more progressive, so is the media and art. Hairstylist LaChanda Gatson decided to redefine the image of a traditional princess in a stunning photoshoot that showcases elegant, colorful and brave African American princesses

Regis and Kahran, the duo behind CreativeSoul Photography, produced a series of 14 photographs showcasing princesses with “[their] own dash of style, culture and swag”. Bored Panda reached out to the photographer duo and they provided a brief explanation behind the project. “The princess series was created by hairstylist LaChanda Gatson and child photographers CreativeSoul Photography,” they explained how this project was a collaboration between creative minds.

The goal is to inspire more girls around the world to start seeing themselves as regal princesses,” the photographers explained. We could definitely spot some similarities with the iconic Disney princesses so we decided to guess which ones they might represent!

See the stunning princesses for yourself

      #1 Princess Rapunzel

disney princesses reimagined as black princesses     

 #2 – PRINCESS JASMINE

   #3- PRINCESS TIANA

#4- PRINCESS CINDERELLA

#5- PRINCESS NALA

#6- PRINCESS MOANA

#7- PRINCESS POCAHONTAS

#8- PRINCESS ANNA

#9- PRINCESS ELSAWhat 14 Disney Princesses Would Like If They Were African American

#Africancreativeseries: Meet Mobile Photographer, Derrick O Boateng From Ghana

#9-  PRINCESS SNOW WHITE

What 14 Disney Princesses Would Like If They Were African American

#N011- PRINCESS AURORA
What 14 Disney Princesses Would Like If They Were African American

#NO12- PRINCESS SHURIWhat 14 Disney Princesses Would Like If They Were African American

#NO12- PRINCESS BELLEMore info: creativesoulphoto.com | Facebook | Instagram | Facebook | Instagram

What 14 Disney Princesses Would Like If They Were African American

#NO14 – PRINCESS ARIEL
What 14 Disney Princesses Would Like If They Were African American

The photographers also revealed that people’s response has been great so far! “The social media response has been amazing with currently over 75,000 reshares on our Facebook post and several other pages,” they told Brored panda

 

Source:Bored Panda

 

 

Set to perform at the TicketPro Dome in Johannesburg, South Africa on 12 June 2020, Cardi B is one of the most sought-after voices in global Hip-Hop yielding a Grammy award and a world record for the Most Simultaneous Billboard US Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Top 10 entries by a female.

This will be the first time Bronx, New York rapper will be performing in South Africa. Last year, Cardi B visited Africa for the first time and was booked to headline shows in Nigeria and Ghana.

The event will open doors from 5:00pm

 MoyoAfrika has decided to take you on a journey through Africa, through its many and diverse talents, by offering you a series of interviews with young creatives on the continent. We want to show you the diversity of our cultures, the innumerable talents on the continent and how our young people use new technologies to showcase their creative minds.

Africa has a youth bulge; at least 40% of our population consists of the youth. Creativity and innovation are the best tools the youth have at their disposal to chart a new path for their respective countries. Our main goal is to showcase the upcoming artists and give them the exposure they deserve.

For the first interview, we met Ouattara Moussa Idriss Mahaman as known as  O’kiins Howara. He is an Ivorian, self-taught photographer and student of communication. His main working tool is his smartphone.

Solo travel can be a scary concept, no matter who you are. Add in being a woman — and a black woman, at that — and suddenly traveling alone can seem downright daunting.

Traveling solo as a woman can seem to be an intimidating way to explore the world for many people. But, the reality is that thousands of women travel solo and are more independent and confident because of it.