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On Wednesday, residents in South Africa and Brazil volunteered to begin the testing of a COVID-19 vaccination trial developed by the University of Oxford in Britain.

The trials are starting in South Africa because it is being said that the country was responsible for nearly one-third of the continent’s positive cases.

Although the continent of Africa as a whole was one of the last places to get hit by the pandemic, health officials are saying that numbers are now beginning to spike.

Like many countries that have a history with the Transatlantic Slave Trade, Brazil has never been able to grapple the matters of race. Frankly, no other country on that side of the world with the historic significance of the Transatlantic Slave Trade has competently figured out how to navigate the matters of race.

Data shows that out of the more than 9.5 million people taken from Africa between the 16th and 19thcenturies, more than 4 million slaves landed in Rio de Janeiro.  That’s nearly 10 times more than the total number of slaves sent to North America during this time frame.

After hundreds of years of silence and denial, leaders in Brazilrecognized the contributions from those of Africa descent during the 2016 Summer Olympic Games and addressed the impact enslaved people made on the country’s history.

People of color felt it was a turning point for the country to tackle racism head-on in a place where the impact of slavery continue to manifest itself in the obstacles Afro-Brazilians face compared to their white counterparts.

You see it in Rio’s favelas, which translates to “low-income neighborhoods,” where Afro-Brazilians disproportionately dwell and in the workplace where on average, black Braziliansearn 57 percent less than white Brazilians.

You also witness the impacts of a post-slavery society in the criminal justice system where Black people make up more than 64 percent of the prisonpopulation, and black youth are killed at an alarming rate.

In 2017, the Permanent Forum Racial Equality, a Brazilian coalition that advocates on behalf of black and anti-racist movements, petitioned the UN’s Human Rights Council on the rate of targeted homicides of young black Brazilians, as reported in Face 2 Face Africa.

The report found that black youth are murdered in Brazil every 23 minutes. More than 70% of murder victims in Brazil are black and 93% of the time, they are men.

But the study gets worse.

Investigators concluded that they “came upon a cruel and undeniable reality: ‘the Brazilian state, directly or indirectly, perpetrates the genocide of the young black population.’”

The report only confirmed what anti-racists advocates and black people have known for some time.

African Women’s Legacy: From Hatshepsut to Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

But one thing that sticks out in the report is that Brazilians had come to expect young black men to be killed.  Lawyer Daniel Teixeira told the Agencia Brasil that the situation in Brazil had become “neutralized.”

Read more about the study and its findings here.

 

Source: Travel Noire

Davido, a Nigerian singer, songwriter, and record producer dropped his vibrant new music video for his track #1Milli. He is giving us major Yoruba and Afro-Caribbean moreover Brazilian vibes. Also, with the show off of Afro-descendant  Religion, which was taken to the New World by Yoruba slaves from Africa.

One year after the release of “Assurance” visuals, where Davido proudly showed us his girlfriend and current fiancée in a music video that had 53 million views, he returns with “1 milli” visual, the second track of his album A Good Time. This one also features his soon-to-be bride Chioma Rowland. This is a song where he expresses his love for her and talks about the bride price he is willing to pay for his beloved.

This clip is a vibrant tribute to the Afro-Caribbean community descending from Africa. Most of all, in this carnival period, the release of this clip is not insignificant. The traditional getup, the landscapes, the atmosphere delivers homage to the Afro-Brazilian community which is instantly recognizable. Indeed, this community is renowned for having the second-largest black community where African influences are still very present through. For example, the candomblé religion which is one of the Afro-Brazilian religions practiced in Brazil, but also in neighboring countries such as Uruguay, Cuba, Paraguay, Argentina, and Venezuela.

A mixture of catholicism, indigenous rites, and African beliefs, this religion consists of a cult of orixás (pronounced “oricha”), the candomblé gods of totemic and family origin, each associated with a natural element (water, forest, fire, lightning, etc.)
In Brazil, especially in Salvador de Bahia, Osun is an orisha goddess who is truly praised. She is a goddess found in Yoruba mythology.

Cultural Celebrations In Africa That Are Worth Catching A Flight For

Davido who is of Yoruba heritage, commemorate the end of Black History Month by promoting black unity but also by celebrating the Afro-Caribbean culture, knowing that the carnival culture was initiated by Afro-descendants.

Watch Davido's Afro-Caribbean Inspired Vibrant New Music Visuals Watch Davido's Afro-Caribbean Inspired Vibrant New Music Visuals

As with all great migrations, the Africans that arrived in the carribean not only brought over their strength and beauty but also their music and cultural traditions.

Since the country abolished slavery rather late, in 1888, a large number of African natives kept being brought across the ocean, a fact that considerably influenced Brazil’s contemporary ethnic make-up. Afro-Brazilians now represent almost half of the country’s inhabitants, making them the majority when it comes to ethnic groups and Brazil  the largest black population in the African Diaspora with more than 55 million people identifying as black or of mixed race.