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Each year, thousands of people visit Africa for many reasons. Some visit as tourists, experts, volunteers or for business purposes. How these people interpret their experiences in Africa sometimes serves as representing images to their friends, family, or colleagues.

I often read disappointing blogs or watch YouTube videos that don’t sit well with me.

If you are looking to visit Africa and have a wonderful time here, I have put together a few tips to help you achieve that. I left Africa as a teenager about 16 years ago and this is my first return.

Fashion has always been a world-building up multiple trends in order to validate your resume of fashion addicts and to see how your creativity can reinvent those trends and make them yours.

There is a meaning behind everything, and sometimes we don’t necessarily pay attention to the cultural or spiritual aspect of what we wear. Fashion has demystified apparat, trendiness took out their real estate and the values that they encouraged. 

We will talk about some accessories that we’ve seen on our favorite cover magazine or celebrity and give their ethnic aspect in Africa and for others in the world.

Cowries

Cowries are now the trendiest accessory you can have in your closet this year. Traveling from Africa, Asia, their necklaces and jewelry are on every continent.
In the past, it was used as a currency in West Africa, one of the most successful in the world, especially during the great empires of Ghana, Mali, and Songhaï.

Cowries had a strong spiritual value and cultural aspect, horns, fetishes were set with cowries used by both healer and sorcerer. These objects and costumes covered with them are found in Casamance among the Diola and in Eastern Senegal among the Bassari, where the traditional religion is still alive.

 

On the symbolic level, the cowries are frequently connected with the feminine.

Their shape being associated with that of the female sex, cowries can be used during fertility rites. Unfortunately, in most countries, cowries have lost its ritualistic and symbolic value, even though in some tribes it is still used and seen as a protective charm or divination tool by divine tellers, but now we can all give them another sense through fashion and we are loving it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beyoncé (Singer, Songwriter), wearing a Lafalaise Dion headpiece

 

                        

               Gold

Gold is the most precious metal in the world but guess which continent produced and register the largest goldmine? Africa. Egyptians Gods and pharaoh were always represented with gold, it was one of the most symbolic object to define royalty.

African history with gold despite of the blood spilled caused by covetousness, still remain one of the most common used material in our communities. You have seen gold in weddings, married couples were certainly dancing with their golden costume and jewelry. Gold implies wealth in our societies and nowadays shines on rings, necklaces, gourmets, etc

Meanwhile, it still has its same aspect in Akan tribes having a symbol of power, spiritual force by creating statuette that were worshipped and used as another language for educational purpose to the youngest. In Mali, the Dioula people use it as a lucky and protective charm. You will hear stories of gold being a present from the gods in countries like Ghana, Mali and South Africa that still have a strong relationship with gold and are the countries producing the most in the world.

10 African Fashion Brands That Magnify Men’s Wear

Mansa Musa, was the tenth Mansa of the Mali Empire and made Mali the largest producer of gold in the world, and Musa has been considered one of the richest people on earth.

 


Bags

Bags and handbags have been noted throughout history as far back as ancient Egypt – hieroglyphics depict men carrying bags tied around their waist (similar to a modern-day fanny pack).
Peasants and farmers in early civilizations were known to carry seeds and grains in small bags and African priests have been known to carry beaded bags as a sign of luxury and power. They were shaped through fashion and adapted to every need from the smallest to the largest (Handbags, Backpack).

 


Ghana must go” is a brand that we all have seen one day at the airport or we even ourselves carried to travel, this popular bag was used by several West African citizens, especially Ghanaians, to contain their belongings as they were forced to leave Nigeria during the 1980s. Now it’s getting appropriated by western fashion companies during their fashion shows.
Handbags have become a fashion accessory, that men and women cannot live without.

 

 

Shoes

Some people still believe that Europeans are the ones that introduced shoes in Africa, that we were a land of naked and barefoot.

Let me warn you before you start realizing your ignorance. They were often reserved for ceremonial functions and for royalty. Traditional materials to make shoes, as discerned by anthropologists, were rawhide, leather, and metal; to mention a few. Interestingly, archaeologists have discovered that Ancient Egyptians made shoes for the right and left foot; unlike earlier European shoes.

The Hausa seem to have the most documented shoe history of the continent. Their leatherwork is considered legendary throughout West Africa and their intrinsic work has constructed the likes of boots and sandals. Ghana, in particular the Akan’s community, had

the Ahenema which is a local slipper that commands respect, majesty, and authority in society. The shoes were made using plant material, with climbing plants making the upper and gradually started to use leather in the shoes which were referred to as ‘chawchaw’ which were for the kings and a few queens in the kingdom.

                                                                                                                         

 

 

Sunglasses

It’s actually hard to precisely know who made the first eyewear in history. Some will talk about the Inuit’s who made rustic ivory sunglasses to protect their eyes from sunlight. Furthermore, it served judges in Ancient China during the trial, made of “smoke-colored quartz” it was used to prevent the prosecution and defense from being able to read the judges’ expressions and not be altered or influenced by accidental facial reactions. Egyptians have the most ancient lenses but we don’t really know if they had sunglasses.
Nowadays sunglasses are a must to have a classy, trendy and are a celebrity go-to accessory but it was either to protect your eyes or used as a microscope.

Why do you wear your accessories, would tell us more? Subscribe to our mail address we want to read everybody!

 

Written by Yao Boni.

 The continent of Africa is bursting with festivals and music celebrations preserving our heritage and culture. Throughout the whole continent, colourful and vibrant festivals range through musical, religious, cultural and harvest to name just a few. Some of these festivals are popular and attract crowds from around the world, but all offer a distinctive form of celebration that highlights the wide array of African cultures and customs.

If you plan on journeying to the Motherland this year, Here are festivals from various countries around the continent you shouldn’t miss when you visit this magical place.

Bouake Carnival ­– Ivory Coast

Each year in March, natives and tourists join together to enjoy music and eat traditional foods during The Bouake Carnival.  The celebration, held at St. Michael’s Cathedral, is known as a celebration of life and friendship. Tourists and natives join together to enjoy great music, eat traditional foods, explore the cultural markets and join in the well- known street parties and parades. So if you are looking for a hot spot, or maybe even a little culture shock, you should definitely go and check one of West Africa’s largest Carnivals, Bouake Carnival.

Bouake Carnival ­– Ivory Coast

The Festival Of Roses – Morocco

If you plan to be in Morocco in May,  then head to theFestival of Roses held in the small town of Kalaat M’Gounna. The city is known for its beautiful landscape of pink Persian roses, which is why locals celebrate the flowers.  The three-day celebration filled with food, dancing, and singing attracts more than 20,000 people every year! The streets are then covered with a blanket of roses for shows and concerts of Berber groups. You can of course also shop in the souks or even learn how rose water is made. On the last day of the festival, one of the most beautiful women in town will be elected as the Miss Roses of that particular year.

Exciting Cultural Festivals In Africa To Check Out In 2020

Nyege Nyege – Uganda

Nyege Nyege stands for peace, love, and abundant joy, for underground music and musicians in Africa, according to event organizers.

The four-day international music festival aims to showcase “The Pearl of Africa” through music and art.

Festivals In Africa

Zanzibar International Film Festival – Tanzania

Established in 1997, the Zanzibar International Film Festival is East Africa’s largest film and arts festival, exhibiting the latest and best films and promoting films, music, art, and design.

In addition to nine straight days of music and film screenings, attendees have the chance to attend discussion panels and workshops.

An In-depth Look At The Influence Of African Culture On Rio Carnival In Brazil

Cultural Festivals In Africa

Cape Town International Jazz Festival – South Africa

Affectionately referred to as “Africa’s Grandest Gathering”, the Cape Town International Jazz Festival is the largest music event in sub-Saharan Africa. The festival is famous for its star-studded line up of local and international artists.

Exciting Cultural Festivals In Africa

 

It would be hard to find a little girl who’s never wanted to be a Disney princess. Or any princess for that matter. Unfortunately, our media is not very inclusive and the majority of iconic princesses in children’s movies and books fit a very stiff mold that not all children can relate to. But as our society is becoming more progressive, so is the media and art. Hairstylist LaChanda Gatson decided to redefine the image of a traditional princess in a stunning photoshoot that showcases elegant, colorful and brave African American princesses

Regis and Kahran, the duo behind CreativeSoul Photography, produced a series of 14 photographs showcasing princesses with “[their] own dash of style, culture and swag”. Bored Panda reached out to the photographer duo and they provided a brief explanation behind the project. “The princess series was created by hairstylist LaChanda Gatson and child photographers CreativeSoul Photography,” they explained how this project was a collaboration between creative minds.

The goal is to inspire more girls around the world to start seeing themselves as regal princesses,” the photographers explained. We could definitely spot some similarities with the iconic Disney princesses so we decided to guess which ones they might represent!

See the stunning princesses for yourself

      #1 Princess Rapunzel

disney princesses reimagined as black princesses     

 #2 – PRINCESS JASMINE

   #3- PRINCESS TIANA

#4- PRINCESS CINDERELLA

#5- PRINCESS NALA

#6- PRINCESS MOANA

#7- PRINCESS POCAHONTAS

#8- PRINCESS ANNA

#9- PRINCESS ELSAWhat 14 Disney Princesses Would Like If They Were African American

#Africancreativeseries: Meet Mobile Photographer, Derrick O Boateng From Ghana

#9-  PRINCESS SNOW WHITE

What 14 Disney Princesses Would Like If They Were African American

#N011- PRINCESS AURORA
What 14 Disney Princesses Would Like If They Were African American

#NO12- PRINCESS SHURIWhat 14 Disney Princesses Would Like If They Were African American

#NO12- PRINCESS BELLEMore info: creativesoulphoto.com | Facebook | Instagram | Facebook | Instagram

What 14 Disney Princesses Would Like If They Were African American

#NO14 – PRINCESS ARIEL
What 14 Disney Princesses Would Like If They Were African American

The photographers also revealed that people’s response has been great so far! “The social media response has been amazing with currently over 75,000 reshares on our Facebook post and several other pages,” they told Brored panda

 

Source:Bored Panda

 

 

Since the country abolished slavery rather late, in 1888, a large number of African natives kept being brought across the ocean, a fact that considerably influenced Brazil’s contemporary ethnic make-up. Afro-Brazilians now represent almost half of the country’s inhabitants, making them the majority when it comes to ethnic groups and Brazil  the largest black population in the African Diaspora with more than 55 million people identifying as black or of mixed race.

A continent of 54 countries, 2000 languages and over 3000 tribes, Africa has a staggeringly diverse array of cultures. It’s no surprise that Africa is home to some of the best cultural festivals on the planet

The wide variety of music, cultural, harvest, and religious festivals in Africa is almost as unique as the continent itself. Some of these festivals are well-known and attract people  from around the world, but all offer a distinctive form of celebration that highlights the wide array of African cultures and customs.

Miss South Africa Zozibini Tunzi has a unique idea for her Miss Universe National Costume competition entry asking men to send in love letters to the women in their life to form part of her outfit inspired by Khosi Nkosi.
In preparation of her journey to represent Mzansi at Miss Universe 2019, Miss SA Zozibini Tunzi has called on SA men to write love letters to women with the launch of her #HeForShe campaign. The letters will be an important part of the design process of a costume that she will don at Miss Universe in Atlanta, Georgia, on December 8.
The campaign is aligned with the UN’s #HeForShe global solidarity movement that advocates for the advancement of gender equality aiming to mobilise men as allies in the struggle against Gender-based violence and the creation of an equal society for all.
Tunzi has urged SA men to pledge their support by posting videos and selfies on social media using #HeForShe and #MissSALoveLetter. In the caption they must include their love letter to SA women.
She took to her social media:
 
I am asking men to write love letters to the women of South Africa. Those letters will be inscribed on to ribbons of fabric which will, in turn, form part of my national costume,” Miss South Africa said.
“In what will be a first, I will literally take South Africa with me to Miss Universe; I will wear a wave of love from men in the form of love letters celebrating and honouring the women of this country.”
The 2019 Miss South Africa winner said she wanted to shift the perception about gender-based violence.
Women are constantly being taught how to defend themselves against attack from men. I would like to shift the perception,” Tunzi said.
“I want to say that responsibility should no longer rest on the shoulders of women alone. I want the men of our nation to stand and take a stand against gender-based violence”.
 
We have to start the narration where right-thinking people act as role models for those who think it’s okay to mistreat women.
That’s my aim with my campaign.
To be part of my #MissSALoveLetter, make your pledge by visiting www.heforshe.org and share your message of love to the women of South Africa on Twitter and Facebook. By using #heforshe and #MissSALoveLetter as well as @official_misssa and @zozitunzi, your message of unity will be seen by the Universe.