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Award winning South African Rapper Nasty C has been signed to American based record company Def Jam Recordings via a joint venture with Universal Music Africa, Billboard confirms.

According to Billboard, The 23 year old will be releasing his new album ‘Zulu Man With Some Power’ under his new label. His latest single was premiered on Thursday on Apple Music Beats 1 with Ebro Darden. A video was also released.

Confirming the new deal, Def Jam Recordings interim chairman/CEO Jeff Harleston stated, “Nasty C is a unique and forward-thinking artist who is at the forefront of a new generation of rappers emerging from Africa. Def Jam is a globally recognised brand synonymous with excellence in hip-hop, and we are excited to welcome Nasty C : an international star with real vision and talent  into the family.”

John Boyega has sign a deal with Netflix to produce a slate of non-English language films focusing on West and East Africa

“It’s powerful to be a part of the Def Jam family,” added Nasty C. “It’s an iconic record label and has made the careers of many of the artists I look up to.”

The video was shot at a location in Nasty C’s hometown of Durban. The video was directed  by Andrew Sandler, who has worked with artists such as lil Wayne, and Chris brown.

WATCH THE VIDEO HERE:

 

As coronavirus spreads and the number of reported cases increases, countries around the world are taking drastic measures, including shutting down airports, imposing travel bans and completely sealing their borders.

The outbreak of the Corona Virus has been labelled a pandemic by the World Health Organisation( WHO).

Below are the African Countries that have taken such measures in recent days

If you can stay home during the coronavirus crisis, you should. But what should you watch while you’re stuck inside? If you’re looking for a distraction from the world or just something to put on in the background while you keep checking the news, we’ve got  suggestions for TV comfort food.  Here are shows that we’re watching ourselves right now.

It’s time to grab a snack, call Bae and get cozy for a mandatory binge-watching TV sesh. (Note: A break from the news is bueno for your mental health.

Source: Essence

 

According to The Hollywood Reporter, John Boyega and his UpperRoom Productions have signed a deal with Netflix to develop non- English films focusing on West and East Africa.

Netflix says that UpperRoom “will develop film projects based on stories, cast, characters, crew, literary properties, mythology, screenplays and or other elements in or around African Countries.

Boyega, whose family is from Nigeria, Said in a statement that he’s thrilled to be working with Netflix on this, especially with the idea of making non-English films that adapt African stories and original material.

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Recently, Netflix has made an effort to prioritise original content from Africa. Netflix shared its plans to offer more African shows back in 2018. Its latest African original, Queen Sono, dropped worldwide at the end of February, while another as-yet unnamed series set in Nigeria was announced at the same time. Meanwhile, two further originals, South African teen drama Blood & Water and animated series Mama K’s Team 4 are set to land later this year.

Speaking to Variety, vice president of international film at Netflix, David Kosse, said, “Africa has a rich history in storytelling, and for Netflix, this partnership with John and UpperRoom presents an opportunity to further our investment in the continent while bringing unique African stories to our members both in Africa and around the world.” Estimates suggest that subscriber figures for Africa are currently low, but Nollywood is a multi-billion dollar industry, so the potential for Netflix’s growth in Africa as a whole is huge.

 

African Women hold an incredible legacy on their back, a vibrant history of queen, pharaohs, leaders and thinkers that, still today manifest their feminine energy into our current society through those who are bold enough to lift their voices in a patriarchal society, always diminishing their power and make them seek refuge in fear and forced empathy, accepting every form of violence from this system.

Today, we are not only highlighting those great figures that we all know and we all respect but it’s a short path that we’ll draw on the sand with a small piece of wood that will lead to understand many aspect and roles African women played or faced to be who they are today.

 

Hatshepsut – fifth pharaoh of the Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt

Hatshepsut: The pharaoh is a woman

Actually she wasn’t the first woman to reign on men, but she was the most iconic to do so. Hatshepsut came on the throne with knowledge on economy, international diplomacy and for 20 years she managed to enhance Egypt and build wealth over her kingdom. She was a visionary and participated in major technical advanced and discovery, by financing and leading the first expedition to the Land of Punt (Region of Somalia) who was believed to be an ancient kingdom, where the first Egyptians are coming from. As a matter of fact she paved the way for strong, magnificent buildings that many pharaohs claim as theirs, transplanted foreign trees into her royal yard that a generation benefited from.

 

 

African Women’s Legacy: From Hatshepsut to Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Original Beauty

When we talk about beauty, African women have a strong resume. From Nefertiti that overshadowed every women in history for her beauty that was registered so many times through time to Makeda: Queen of Sheba that brang another sense to it with her internal beauty (wisdom, compassion, respect, boldness, fearlessness and self-esteem) a strong value in Africa.

The black of their skin was described as gold, their hair were crown, worn to express their creativity and versatility, and they knew many secrets of beauty that they passed down from mother to daughter. African woman are naturally beautiful and smart, praised for their strong curves holding themselves and others on their back. Beauty wasn’t something to seek for when they already knew they were, accepting every aspect of their bodies, African women were their own standard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Furthermore, some accessories like fragrance, wigs, cowries, and make up were already used in the past in a sense of beauty enhancer. External beauty may seem false and give a wrong impression of someone’s true nature for instance many distinctive signs of beauty were established in different tribes like necklaces and jewelries by Zulu people, stripes on faces by the Maasai in Kenya, and face scarification by Yoruba people in Nigeria.

 

African Women’s Legacy: From Hatshepsut to Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

 

Abla Pokou TO

FREEDOM, Glorified. 

Women held an important power in many chieftaincies and tribes in Africa. Matriarchy was a system that gave African women power positions in politics, social privilege and control. One of the most common tribe that is known for this societal organization is the Akan people. Their society is matrilineal, meaning that all inheritance matters are based on the mother. Female were leaders, they weren’t only this stereotypical etiquette on their reproductive capacity, they allowed greatness on their entire lineage.

Ablah Pokou was an Akan queen that sacrificed her baby to save her kingdom and allowed them to reach another land for safety. Her people were named Baoulé, word coming from (Baouli: The child has died) a homage to her lost child. On top of that she is venerated and represents courage, woman leadership, determination, spreading the message of this legend that survived every ages to inspire more women.

#InspiredByHer: Ezinne Kwubiri, Head of Diversity and Inclusion at H&M North America

Art was very important in African societies, it described our culture, stories, deities through paintings, sculptures and more. African women were making potteries, baskets, sewing, designing textiles etc.…

Although they were participating in creating art pieces, most of the time the artworks, masks and sculpted figures represented their bodies, their nudity and were even used for rituals, fertility purpose. Women were both creators and subject, and female beauty was portrayed and glorified by both men and women.

 

 

Between lust and a cursed heritage

This huge legacy was coveted and African women will never be the same. The colonial era brought violence, gender discrimination, women were losing their power in African societies becoming only objects. African women are now highly disrespected, the one that were painted as goddess are now playing not a second but third role. Marriage was important but now that’s the only title that they can pretend to in this new one hundred percent patriarchal society.The black of their skin was described as dirty, ugly and their hair were cut, burned, hidden to make them believe something they were not. Broken families, burned traditions, lost empathy, bashed blood, bleached skin, hair cut, tragedy.

Saartje Baartman was one of the many victims, this curvy african woman was sexualized, abused, raped, and lived a depressed life before dying sadly at a young age. This marked not the start but years of humiliation over african women that started losing their yesteryear strong aspect. However, they were still perceived as strong but in a negative way. For this reason, they are not allowed to cry, to be vulnerable, they have to compromise no matter what happen to their dignity and self-worth.

After centuries of oppression, trying to step back, the world was always an enemy to their fulfillment like a curse, casted by history that generations will face until they find a counter spell.

 

African Women’s Legacy: From Hatshepsut to Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

 

We should all be Feminist!

Nowadays, we see another era of women claiming for equity and equality. They are tired of male supremacy and male privilege, the “a woman is supposed to stay at home” narrative is for the past, education for young African girls, redefine our culture and the aspect that doesn’t allow them to evolve, tell women to not accept everything formed against them in this world. LETS ALL BE FEMINIST.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche, a Nigerian writer is now a feminist icon in Africa and beyond. She wants equality, she wants dignity and respect for every women in this world. After sending powerful messages in her TED talk, she exhorts women and men to join this fight for generations to uncast the curse. She is a great example of leadership, greatness, elegance and intelligence, that’s an African Women.

 

 

Now we have Ellen Johnson Sirleaf the first woman elected president in Africa in 2005, who maintained Liberia and imposed herself in this so called man dominated field, that’s an African Woman, which created controversy because of her gender.

She was certainly guided by Hatshepsut’s spirit her great ancestor aura who proved years ago, she was more than her gender, don’t limit myself when I can run this world too. Black women will always find a way to reach their final form, our first mothers coming from the so called motherland, breaking codes as they will set their reign to another era allowing a future generation of African women to first breathe in this world without holding one nostril.

 

 

 

 

Written by Yao Boni.

Davido, a Nigerian singer, songwriter, and record producer dropped his vibrant new music video for his track #1Milli. He is giving us major Yoruba and Afro-Caribbean moreover Brazilian vibes. Also, with the show off of Afro-descendant  Religion, which was taken to the New World by Yoruba slaves from Africa.

One year after the release of “Assurance” visuals, where Davido proudly showed us his girlfriend and current fiancée in a music video that had 53 million views, he returns with “1 milli” visual, the second track of his album A Good Time. This one also features his soon-to-be bride Chioma Rowland. This is a song where he expresses his love for her and talks about the bride price he is willing to pay for his beloved.

This clip is a vibrant tribute to the Afro-Caribbean community descending from Africa. Most of all, in this carnival period, the release of this clip is not insignificant. The traditional getup, the landscapes, the atmosphere delivers homage to the Afro-Brazilian community which is instantly recognizable. Indeed, this community is renowned for having the second-largest black community where African influences are still very present through. For example, the candomblé religion which is one of the Afro-Brazilian religions practiced in Brazil, but also in neighboring countries such as Uruguay, Cuba, Paraguay, Argentina, and Venezuela.

A mixture of catholicism, indigenous rites, and African beliefs, this religion consists of a cult of orixás (pronounced “oricha”), the candomblé gods of totemic and family origin, each associated with a natural element (water, forest, fire, lightning, etc.)
In Brazil, especially in Salvador de Bahia, Osun is an orisha goddess who is truly praised. She is a goddess found in Yoruba mythology.

Cultural Celebrations In Africa That Are Worth Catching A Flight For

Davido who is of Yoruba heritage, commemorate the end of Black History Month by promoting black unity but also by celebrating the Afro-Caribbean culture, knowing that the carnival culture was initiated by Afro-descendants.

Watch Davido's Afro-Caribbean Inspired Vibrant New Music Visuals Watch Davido's Afro-Caribbean Inspired Vibrant New Music Visuals

As with all great migrations, the Africans that arrived in the carribean not only brought over their strength and beauty but also their music and cultural traditions.

The highly anticipated National Museum of African American Music is scheduled to open in Downton Nashville in Summer 2020, the National museum of African American music will be a 56,000 square-foot facility that will encourage visitors to discover the many connections and influences that African Americans have made on America’s music.  From classical to country, to jazz and hip hop, NMAAM will integrate history and interactive technology to share the untold story of more than 50 music genres and sub-genres of music.  it will be an unparalleled institution, not confined by record label, genre or recording artist, but instead will tell a unique narrative through the lens of black music and bring musicians from the past to the present.

“The perception nationally, I think, is that Nashville is just country music. And while we love country music, I think it’s important to touch base on all the other musical genres African Americans have helped to influence,” Tamar Smithers, director of Education and Public Programs​​, told Black Enterprise.

 

There have been several efforts made to push projects that celebrate Black music history forward. Last year legendary music mogul Berry Gordy donated $4 million towards the expansion of the Detroit-based Motown Museum. The museum—which is inside of the record label’s first headquarters—captures the history, impact and influence that Motown has had on the music industry and beyond by highlighting the stories of artists like Stevie Wonder, The Temptations, Marvin Gaye and The Jackson 5.

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African American music has a very rich history and originated from slaves during the 1600s who used songs to communicate with each other. In the fields as slaves were working you could hear them singing songs to pass the time. Back in Africa, rhythm was part of daily life and was incorporated into labour, rituals, and celebrations within the community.

Check out the virtual tour below:

 

Set to perform at the TicketPro Dome in Johannesburg, South Africa on 12 June 2020, Cardi B is one of the most sought-after voices in global Hip-Hop yielding a Grammy award and a world record for the Most Simultaneous Billboard US Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Top 10 entries by a female.

This will be the first time Bronx, New York rapper will be performing in South Africa. Last year, Cardi B visited Africa for the first time and was booked to headline shows in Nigeria and Ghana.

The event will open doors from 5:00pm

The Afrobeats genre nowadays gathers several genres, different vibes and it is not always easy to define or to put in boxes. Today, we are witnessing a new movement, a new scene that wants to be “alternative”, that explores Nigerian music with a new approach.

These are Artists who, most of the time work together to create a new and more challenging style.

 

It is a genre who is drawing on Indies, dancehall, Old Rn&B, neo-soul and more.

The headliners or leaders of this movement are Santi and Odunsi The Engine. They were for a long time critical of their difference because a lot of music lovers thought they were being different on purpose for difference’s sake.

Art and creativity are very important for these artists, they put a point of honor on their visuals always wavy or they explore embracing natural hair and gender fluidity all through a DIY Handycam aesthetic. The flamboyant visuals illustrate their desire to challenge the status quo.

The approach of those artists is to show as a Nigerian and millenial you can be whoever you want, it’s about the “freedom to be“.

The will behind this movement is to fight against mainstream music and have total control of their careers, most of the Alte Artists as Lady Donli as example started on Soundcloud then grew organically.

Finally, It is about the style, you have to be a bit Edgy, bucket hats, small sunglasses, and androgynous clothing their favorites pick!

Here are MoyoAfrika’s favorites artists and visuals, enjoy, share and update your playlist!

  • Alte Cruise” of Santi, Zamir, and Odunsi the Engine

Alté Cruise is an addictive title in which the singers deal with the importance of communicating expectations in any intimate relationship. The title puts us directly in the mood and captures the spirit of this musical genre.

Melvitto is a Nigerian producer and singer who is also part of the underground scene. An interesting artist to discover with a bewitching sound, Afro Indies and Afropop influence. His music is refreshing, catchy and endearing.

Listen to “Santorini Coffee” from his EP “THENIGHTSTILLYOUNG“,our pick for you!

Show dem camp is a group of Nigerian rappers and singers who navigate between their Rap and Afrobeat influences. They are the authors of the successful album “Palmwine music“, a colorful project full of good vibes.  As individuals, they believe in the power of organic growth, their name changes can give you an insight into that journey. If you don’t know them, you definitely need them in your playlist!

Listen to “Tropicana” here!

Amaarae is a Ghanaian singer, songwriter, and composer who makes music that can be defined as a fusion of RnB, trip-hop, Alte, afrobeats, dancehall, and non-conformist. Her particularity is her strong visual identity, very closed of the Nigerian Alte scene she is considered as a UFO in the Ghanaian industry.

Discover her enchanting voice here listening to “Like It

King Perryy is an Afro dancehall artist from Nigeria, who started music in 2014. Recently he has been trying to open new doors and flow through different fusion of musical genres, we especially liked “Work’N’Grind” which we suggest you listen to here!

 

Boj is one of the most important figures of this movement even if he has been a headliner. He has been present in the game in an underground way for many years and has collaborated with Artists like Falz, Ajebutter22, MI Abaga, and many others. His particularity is his voice timbre, it is his signature A fuzzy, low-end register that fills substantial space but is ethereal in texture.

Listen to “Magic“, from his Album “Magic” released in 2017 who featured artists such as Olamide, Wande Coal, Falz, Banky W, Ycee, Simi, Ayo Jay, Willy Paul, Seyi Shay, and Lady Jay.

  • Tipsy” Of Odunsi The Engine and RAYE

This music is one of the most famous songs in this movement. We have a mix of elements of R&B, soul and pop part of his global-facing, Afro-fusion sound. His vocal interplay with RAYE is the perfect fit, with both artists possessing the character and the quality to naturally complement each other’s talent.

Watch the video below!

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  • Cash” Of Lady Donli

Lady Donli is one of the freshest one, you probably heard about her od discover her opening the “Lagos to London” Album of Mr Eazi on “Lagos Gyration” or perhaps on her Soundcloud page. We assisted in her incredible organic growth. She has a strong personality which even has repercussions on her work. Lady Donli is playing with highlife music, old traditional Nigerian songs, Pop, and Soul. If you are looking for good African music, looking forward to feeling every instrument in your whole body and music which can actually be a sample in ten or even more years… She is your girl!

Listen to “Cash” Below!

Abuja-based artist Ayüü is also one of the underground Artist you need to hear, he drops

Mango Juice & Bad Decisions  Two years ago and it was really beautiful.

This project served us just the right amount of nostalgia with samplings of songs like Sisquo’s Thong Song (00 Nostalgia), Nelly and Kelly’s Dilemma and Cardi B’s Ring (In 2 Ü) and others. The project is another one that explores the woes of a complicated relationship and shows off Ayüü’s as a singer/rapper. The EP enlists production from Higo, Jaylon, and talent from Psycho YP and Andrè Wolff.

Listen to “00’s Nostalgia” below!

 

  • wys” of AYLØ  and Santi

AYLØ has been discovered in 2016 through his well accepted ‘Honest Conversations‘ EP, then doubling up with a more centered sophomore project, <Insert Project Name>AYLØ has managed to build quite an important fanbase despite not being the most visible artist.  Following the ballad’s soothing affirmations of vulnerability, the clip is really soft and relaxing.

Discover the video here!